Hen treats?

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Wozza1985
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Hen treats?

Post by Wozza1985 » 04 Jan 2014, 21:34

Hi my hens will be fed on a quality layers pellet, what is classed as a treat?
Can I put a pot of mixed corn aswell?

Any other treats ?

Thank you

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Re: Hen treats?

Post by 3441sussex » 04 Jan 2014, 22:42

Hi

I feed my hens layers pellets ad lib and throw in a couple handfuls of wheat during the afternoon for them to scratch around and eat. They do not free range, we have too many foxes around. I have 2 x 50 metre electric poultry fence runs. I swap the hens between the two runs every couple of weeks so they do not get muddy and fresh grass is available. I don’t feed them anything else. The layers pellets provide all the nutrients they need. In my opinion so called treats are unnecessary unless you want fat chicken.

Hope this is of help.

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son of eddy
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Re: Hen treats?

Post by son of eddy » 05 Jan 2014, 09:17

Wheat or mixed corn is great as a scatter/scratch feed, particularly in very cold weather. It gives the hens warmth so ideal last thing before going to roost. They grind it up in their crops over night and it gradually releases energy which is then turned into warmth.

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Moriarty
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Re: Hen treats?

Post by Moriarty » 05 Jan 2014, 10:44

if you can get fresh mealworms (fishing shop) or dried mealworms then they're a great treat ... also cooked spaghetti cut into short lengths. My hens free range so get lots of everything but rattling a tin with dried corn in it brings them out from their hiding places, or if they've wandered too far. Another treat is warm cooked porridge. Treats in moderation, though, since - as previously said - they get their nourishment from the layers pellets so these are really 'sweeties' !
my chooks: Sage&Onion, Roger the randy cockerel, Squawkbox, Bonnie 'N' Clyde, Pancakes, Custard, Omelette & EggNog. Plus four garden cats and another half dozen feral ones that I feed. And a nursery of pipistrelle bats in the verandah roof ..

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Re: Hen treats?

Post by organic chick » 05 Jan 2014, 12:48

We use layers pellets and corn very rarely (mainly for visiting children to hand feed) We do however give them fresh organic greens from the allotment with cauliflower leaves and sprout stalks the most popular.
Penny and Freckles - the WArren Girls'
Star and Flopsy (the latter of the floppy comb) both members of the White Star Faction.
Fedora and Florence the Cream Legbars
Emily (see Emily lay) and Erica the Light Sussex babes
1 current husband aka the structural engineer
1 large organic allotment
The Lady Isabella Pickford-Fiennes, a feline of distinction and excellent mouser

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Moriarty
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Re: Hen treats?

Post by Moriarty » 05 Jan 2014, 14:12

and, in summer, strawberries and grapes, although be prepared for extremely runny poos afterwards!
my chooks: Sage&Onion, Roger the randy cockerel, Squawkbox, Bonnie 'N' Clyde, Pancakes, Custard, Omelette & EggNog. Plus four garden cats and another half dozen feral ones that I feed. And a nursery of pipistrelle bats in the verandah roof ..

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Re: Hen treats?

Post by Poachedeggontoast » 05 Jan 2014, 18:45

Like many others really - pellets as the main feed, mxd corn as an afternoon sort of snack but the thing that turns my lot into mini harrier jump jets is cooked rice. They love it and as we eat rice in some form or another 2 0r 3 times a week it is a regular treat for them.

Even if its the stuff that gets dry and caught on the bottom of the pan once its soaked in water and then taken out and drained before the pan can be washed it will be greeted enthusiasticly!! so no need to cook extra.......................... :-'''

P egg on T

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Moriarty
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Re: Hen treats?

Post by Moriarty » 06 Jan 2014, 08:58

ha ha yes, you're right, cooked rice. When I'm cooking I always 'accidentally' cook too much, such a shame, and of course you can't eat reheated rice so it HAS to go to the chickens, doesn't it. Another treat, very occasionally and especially when they're moulting, is a can of cat food ... now that becomes a feathery frenzy so I have to throw lumps of it around to ensure it doesn't become a battleground.
my chooks: Sage&Onion, Roger the randy cockerel, Squawkbox, Bonnie 'N' Clyde, Pancakes, Custard, Omelette & EggNog. Plus four garden cats and another half dozen feral ones that I feed. And a nursery of pipistrelle bats in the verandah roof ..

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Re: Hen treats?

Post by organic chick » 09 Jan 2014, 21:43

Moriarty wrote:and, in summer, strawberries and grapes, although be prepared for extremely runny poos afterwards!
Quite, but we have recently added Orego stim to the drinking water. Works a treat. More formed poo, far less watery and easier to poo pick from the runs.
Penny and Freckles - the WArren Girls'
Star and Flopsy (the latter of the floppy comb) both members of the White Star Faction.
Fedora and Florence the Cream Legbars
Emily (see Emily lay) and Erica the Light Sussex babes
1 current husband aka the structural engineer
1 large organic allotment
The Lady Isabella Pickford-Fiennes, a feline of distinction and excellent mouser

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Re: Hen treats?

Post by nickyc » 10 Jan 2014, 12:45

Mashed potato. Mine would kill for it. But only if it's been made with butter and milk :roll:

I don't necessarily agree with the notion that treats = fat hens. If they have plenty of space to charge about and aren't imprisoned in a small run, they'll keep suitably trim; mine certainly aren't fat! :grin:

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Re: Hen treats?

Post by drfish » 10 Jan 2014, 13:05

Mine get more treats at this time of year than in summer (when there's obviously more bugs and natural food available), and healthwise, they are all tip-top. As above, in moderation, it's fine, as long as they get a good fill of layers everyday before the treats, and plenty of water. Mine have a penchant for pasta. It's like they've never eaten before when I (also 'accidentally') cook way too much and take them a bowl fun down the garden. The ducks are also quite partial to starchy treats.
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Re: Hen treats?

Post by Lindsay » 10 Jan 2014, 13:32

nickyc wrote: I don't necessarily agree with the notion that treats = fat hens.
`

I couldn't agree more! I have several running free range at the moment. They eat lots of bugs, any food scraps they can find on the compost heap, and are in the process of finishing off the remains of the sunflower seeds that were spilt at harvest plus they like to forage where the grains were stored. I don't think any of them are over-fat.

It comes down to common sense. Any animal (or human) that stays in a small area, and doesn't take much exercise, is going to get fat. Blanket statements that 'x' must equal 'y' aren't always helpful.

In addition - as I boringly keep repeating ;) - hens in France often have maize as a large part of their diet, and I don't believe they are any more unhealthy than their British counterparts.

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Re: Hen treats?

Post by drfish » 10 Jan 2014, 13:41

Lindsay wrote:In addition - as I boringly keep repeating ;) - hens in France often have maize as a large part of their diet, and I don't believe they are any more unhealthy than their British counterparts.
Bet they're more inclined to run away at the first sign of trouble though, waving a white hankie ;)
Giving power to politicians is like giving whiskey and car keys to a teenage boy - P. J. O'Rourke (thanks Jessie)

It's amazing that people can believe everything is predestined but they still look both ways when crossing the road - Stephen Hawking

1 Wife, 3 children, 1 Staffie Bitch (RIP Marley), 1 Chi-Chi, 1 Tuxedo Cat, 1 part Maine Coon cat, male bearded dragon, Horsefield Tortoise, 2 White Silkies, 1 Frizzle Pekin, 1 CLB, 1 Appenzeller Spitzhauben Cockerel, 1 blue laced Wyandotte, 3 Appenzeller x Wynadotte pullets, 1 Call drake, 3 khaki Campbell ducks, 4 (2 male 2 female?) Aylesbury x Campbells, a breeding colony of Dubia cockroaches.

And a lot of Ibuprofen.

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