Importing hatching eggs?

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Postby vanessa » 11 Jun 2007, 06:56

So, the information at the Dover ferry port is inaccurate! GREAT!!
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Postby chook-in-eire » 11 Jun 2007, 09:23

vanessa wrote:So, the information at the Dover ferry port is inaccurate! GREAT!!


No, it's not. Of course any special regulations re bird flu supersede the general legislation.

chook
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Postby Woodburner » 15 Jul 2008, 14:37

chook-in-eire wrote:One can import or export up to 20 eggs between EU countries no problem.
See http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/int-trd ... rds/a8.htm

chook


Chook, not sure what your definition of ok is ;) Maybe it's my interpretation but it seems you need a certificate for any number of eggs?

Typical DEFRA lack of clarity: in the caption it says ". . . fewer than 20 hatching eggs . . ." but in the text it says ". . . fewer than 20 poultry (not including eggs . . ." :? (I need a smiley that looks even more confused than that :oops: )
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Postby chook-in-eire » 15 Jul 2008, 14:52

Confusing alright. The bracket reads "not including eggs or chicks of ratites". The health certificate is required for "poultry". In the section above (>20) the health certificate is specifically mentioned in relation to hatching eggs, so my interpretation would be that for <20 hatching eggs a health certificate is not required, provided of course all other conditions are satisfied. However, I'm not a legal eagle.
All I can say is, he who asketh a lot of question, geteth a lot of answers :twisted:
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Postby stephen » 15 Jul 2008, 17:15

My reading of it is the same. The subclauses are for poultry, not eggs. So the requirements are up to v not vi:

12. In general, Council Directive 90/539/EEC requires that consignments of fewer than 20 poultry (not including eggs or chicks of ratites), must at the time of consignment, have come from flocks which:

i. have been held in the EU Community since hatching or for at least 3 months;
ii. present no clinical signs of contagious poultry disease at the time of consignment;
iii. satisfy the vaccination conditions of Annex III of 90/539/EEC (if they are vaccinated);
iv. are not the subject of any animal health restrictions applicable to poultry;
v. are not located within an area which for animal health reasons is subject to restrictive measures in accordance with Community legislation as a result of an outbreak of diease to which poultry is susceptible.
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Postby Timbo » 21 Jul 2008, 14:53

Oh well, I'm taking 30 duck and chicken eggs to France tomorrow night... to Charente = even though I'm sure the eggs there are just as yummy! I will keep my eyes open for signs. I hope it's 20 eggs per person ;-)
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Postby newby » 21 Jul 2008, 15:37

So how, bearing in mind the X-rays do we go about getting eggs brought over. They insist on x-raying everything as you come through.
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Postby stephen » 22 Jul 2008, 06:27

Timbo wrote:I hope it's 20 eggs per person ;-)
I hope so, too. It should be. Most quotas are personal rather per group or car.

And if you are taking them with you, surely they are just for cooking? ;)
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Postby Timbo » 22 Jul 2008, 07:27

Mine are for eating - but they are in the cool box in the back of the car as I'm on the ferry from Portsmouth to St Malo, then heading down to Saintes in Charente. I know of a few people who travel down to that area at various times during the year by car so if ever I can be of use in getting some hatching eggs down there for anyone, please ask. Of course the house sitter has some jobs to do while I'm away....including looking after 20 Copper Black Maran eggs in the incubator which should be ready a few days after I get back! :lol:
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Re: Importing hatching eggs?

Postby Alan Walker » 02 Jun 2012, 11:37

Apologies for coming late to this subject.
My interest is in exporting fertilised eggs to Vietnam (to introduce to our existing local stock supplying my wife's Phuoc An River Hotel, in Hoi An).
I was 50/50 about whether it is even worth trying, but the comments (above) have been quite encouraging to give it a go.
I was reading the science bit - http://ps.fass.org/content/14/5/284.abstract refers.
However my plan now is to take the eggs with my in my carry on luggage.
Two reasons for this:
1. temperature in the cabin is better than in the cold hold area
2. the X Rays used for hand luggage are much less than the extreme ones used to see through much bulkier checked in bags
If anyone has anything to add I'd be very pleased to receive comments or further tips.
Many thanks,
Alan
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Re: Importing hatching eggs?

Postby nigel » 02 Jun 2012, 22:16

I think Alan, that thanks to shoe and underpants bombers that your eggs, as containing liquid may be confiscated and destroyed by airport security.
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