Egg Drop Syndrome?

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Egg Drop Syndrome?

Postby Leonie » 12 Jun 2013, 19:58

Hi everyone,

Who is familiar with Egg Drop Syndrome in his/her chicken flock?
And, if so, what was your Plan of Action?

I am afraid that our Croad Langshans might suffer from Egg Drop Syndrome. The chickens are apparently healthy, look good, eat and drink well. But their eggs are terrible. Soft shell and bad eggwhite.

Two of our 6 chickens don't lay eggs, and of the other two, one has no problems what so ever (every day an egg and always a good egg) and the other one varies in quality, sometimes good, sometimes a little bit off.

I am wondering what other people might do, since this is our first real flock of chickens.
Before this we only had the two girls who do lay eggs besides the Croad Langshans...

Thanks in advance.
Leonie
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Re: Egg Drop Syndrome?

Postby drfish » 13 Jun 2013, 11:28

Assuming they are all fit and well, I'd look at diet as the primary concern. Are they getting sufficient nutrients in the form of layers pellets, or free-ranging? Is their diet supplemented with grit/oyster shell?
Giving power to politicians is like giving whiskey and car keys to a teenage boy - P. J. O'Rourke (thanks Jessie)

It's amazing that people can believe everything is predestined but they still look both ways when crossing the road - Stephen Hawking

1 Wife, 3 children, 1 Staffie Bitch (RIP Marley), 1 Chi-Chi, 1 Tuxedo Cat, 1 part Maine Coon cat, male bearded dragon, Horsefield Tortoise, 2 White Silkies, 1 Frizzle Pekin, 1 CLB, 1 Appenzeller Spitzhauben Cockerel, 1 blue laced Wyandotte, 3 Appenzeller x Wynadotte pullets, 1 Call drake, 3 khaki Campbell ducks, 4 (2 male 2 female?) Aylesbury x Campbells, a breeding colony of Dubia cockroaches.

And a lot of Ibuprofen.
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Re: Egg Drop Syndrome?

Postby Leonie » 13 Jun 2013, 18:26

Dear drfish,

Thanks for the reply.
The chickens get a layer pellet mixed with a grower pellet. The last one I added a couple of days ago because I thought the ladies could do with a little extra energy.
Besides that they get a mixture of grains and every morning a handful of mealworms.
At all times tey can get oystergrit and fresh/clean water which is available in the pen.
Their pen is filled with sand and their nightplace (where they also lay their eggs) has sawdust and straw.

Every now and then they will receive some garden-garbage (aka plants that we want to get rid of, as dandelion or chinese lantern) or kitchen garbage (cooked potatoes, cooked or raw vegetables). I do try to think about what I give to them. Nothing we won't eat ourselves from the kitchen and plants I don't suspect to be poisonous.

A dutch poultry keeper said to me, when she heard the ration I mentioned above, that I spoil the chickens and give them too much too good. That's why the eggs are off, she said.
Still, I find that hard to believe. Especially since the chickens are not fat. Rather too thin, actually. That's why I thought they could use some extra energy and help.
What do you think?

A vet suggested egg drop syndrome. But that was without seeing the flock or the eggs. We just talked about it.
Leonie
 
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Re: Egg Drop Syndrome?

Postby drfish » 14 Jun 2013, 09:07

I think your Dutch friend was absolutely right. Too many of the treats will result in less of the layers pellets being consumed. Layers pellets are formulated to provide everything a laying chicken needs where free-ranging is not an option. They don't need extra nutrients in the form of veg. Mealworms are just high fat treats, very low in nutritional value. Don't bother with the growers formula either. They are much lower in protein and calcium, ergo will lower the reproductive action, resulting in less eggs being produced.

Generally speaking, if you are to feed treats, feed them late evening, just prior to bedtime. That includes corn and other grains too. They are all high fat food and chickens will take them over pellets every time. Much like a dog would take a piece of steak over dog food.

My advice would be to cut out all the treats completely for a while, and keep them solely on the layers pellets and grit. Might also be worth trying a multivitamin and mineral supplement to try and kick start them. If they do have egg drop syndrome, that's the only way to treat it anyway as far as I know. And it's not always successful even then.
Giving power to politicians is like giving whiskey and car keys to a teenage boy - P. J. O'Rourke (thanks Jessie)

It's amazing that people can believe everything is predestined but they still look both ways when crossing the road - Stephen Hawking

1 Wife, 3 children, 1 Staffie Bitch (RIP Marley), 1 Chi-Chi, 1 Tuxedo Cat, 1 part Maine Coon cat, male bearded dragon, Horsefield Tortoise, 2 White Silkies, 1 Frizzle Pekin, 1 CLB, 1 Appenzeller Spitzhauben Cockerel, 1 blue laced Wyandotte, 3 Appenzeller x Wynadotte pullets, 1 Call drake, 3 khaki Campbell ducks, 4 (2 male 2 female?) Aylesbury x Campbells, a breeding colony of Dubia cockroaches.

And a lot of Ibuprofen.
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Re: Egg Drop Syndrome?

Postby chuck1 » 14 Jun 2013, 09:29

You could try cutting out the 'treats' but from your description of their diet, it sounds fine and there is no need to give growers as it has only slightly different make up. Can't offer any more advice as I've never had this problem. Could it be something in the breeding ?
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